New MABR Faculty Members

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MABR is pleased to welcome two new faculty members.

Brian Roth, assistant professor of fisheries and wildlife, became affiliated with the MABR in August. His research focuses on field and modeling investigations in lake and river ecosystems involving how recreational and commercial fishing affects food web interactions between native and non-native species.

Roth is currently studying how non-native rainbow smelt affect walleye recruitment in inland lakes, ecosystem effects of a commercial fishery on Asian carp in the Illinois River, and by-catch (catch of non-target species) in commercial fisheries in Saginaw Bay and Lake Huron.

Before joining MSU in 2008, Roth was a postdoctoral scientist at Louisiana State University from 2005 to 2008, and he served as a National Science Foundation biocomplexity research assistant at the University of Wisconsin-Madison from 2003 to 2005. He received his doctoral and master’s degrees in limnology and marine science from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 2005 and 2001, respectively, and his bachelor’s degree in ecological biology from the University of Washington in 1998.

Orlando Sarnelle, professor of fisheries and wildlife, became affiliated with the MABR in August. Sarnelle is a limnologist and ecologist whose research focuses on understanding the roles that interactions among aquatic populations (primarily phytoplankton and zooplankton) play in population and community dynamics within lakes. He also is interested in how these interactions affect the overall functioning of aquatic ecosystems.

Sarnelle is currently studying the ecosystem consequences of adaptation related to the interaction between daphnia, the most important consumer of phytoplankton in fresh waters, and cyanobacteria, potentially toxic phytoplankton that have large negative effects on water quality.

Before joining MSU as an assistant professor in 1997, Sarnelle was a postdoctoral scientist at the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis in Santa Barbara, Calif., from 1996 to 1997, and a lecturer and assistant research biologist at the University of California-Santa Barbara from 1992 to 1997. He received his doctorate in aquatic ecology from the University of California-Santa Barbara in 1992, his master’s degree in fisheries biology from the University of Massachusetts-Amherst in 1980 and his bachelor’s degree in biology from Rutgers University in 1976.

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